DELAWARE ART MUSEUM ANNOUNCES 2016 EXHIBITION SCHEDULE

WILMINGTON, DE

For more information about these exhibitions or to request images, please contact Jessica Jenkins, Manager of Marketing & Public Relations, at jjenkins@delart.org or 302-351-8558.

Poetry in Beauty: The Pre-Raphaelite Art of Marie Spartali Stillman

November 7, 2015 – January 31, 2016
On view in The Anthony N. and Catherine A. Fusco Gallery (Gallery 10)

Marie Spartali Stillman (1844-1927) was one of a small number of professional female artists working in the second half of the 19th century. She was an important presence in the Victorian art world of her time and closely affiliated with members of the Pre-Raphaelite circle. Poetry in Beauty, the first retrospective of Spartali Stillman’s work, will showcase approximately 50 works by the artist.

Spartali Stillman’s style reflects her British Pre-Raphaelite training as well as the influence of Renaissance art, derived from the many years she lived and worked in Italy. Works from public and private collections in the US, UK, and Canada, many of which have not been exhibited since Spartali Stillman’s lifetime, will be included in this exhibition.

This exhibition is co-curated by Margaretta Frederick, Delaware Art Museum’s Chief Curator, and Annette Woolard-Provine Curator of the Bancroft Collection; and Jan Marsh, a noted Pre-Raphaelite scholar who is currently working on the Late Victorian Catalogue at the National Portrait Gallery in London. A catalogue will be available and includes essays by the curators and individual entries for each of the works on display.

Organized by the Delaware Art Museum. Poetry in Beauty: The Pre-Raphaelite Art of Marie Spartali Stillman is made possible by the Emily du Pont Memorial Exhibition Fund and the Friends of Rockwood.
Delaware Art Museum Curator: Margaretta S. Frederick, Chief Curator and Curator, Bancroft Pre-Raphaelite Collection.

Helen Farr Sloan, 1911-2005

September 26, 2015 – January 10, 2016
On view in Gallery 9

Helen Farr Sloan was a painter, a printmaker, and an art instructor who dedicated most of her career to promoting the art of her husband, the realist painter and illustrator John Sloan (1871-1951). Since her death in 2005, the Museum has received a substantial number of Helen Farr Sloan’s prints, drawings, and paintings-from her own estate and as donations in her memory. This exhibition showcases her art and honors her legacy as an artist, philanthropist, and resource for generations of scholars of American art.

Organized by the Delaware Art Museum.
Delaware Art Museum Curator: Heather Campbell Coyle, Curator of American Art

Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art

March 5 – May 29, 2016
On view in The Anthony N. and Catherine A. Fusco Gallery (Gallery 10) and Gallery 9

Organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art presents the rich and varied contributions of Latino artists in the United States since the mid-20th century, when the concept of a collective Latino identity began to emerge. Our America showcases the rich diversity of Latino communities in the United States and features artists of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican descent, as well as other Latin American groups with deep roots in the United States. The exhibition explores how Latino artists shaped the artistic movements of their day and recalibrated key themes in American art and culture. The exhibition features 92 works in all media by more than 50 leading modern and contemporary artists.

Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art is organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Generous support for the exhibition has been provided by Altria Group, the Honorable Aida M. Alvarez, Judah Best, The James F. Dicke Family Endowment, Sheila Duignan and Mike Wilkins, Tania and Tom Evans, Friends of the National Museum of the American Latino, The Michael A. and the Honorable Marilyn Logsdon Mennello Endowment, Henry R. Muñoz III, Wells Fargo, and Zions Bank. Additional significant support was provided by The Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. Support for “Treasures to Go,” the Museum’s traveling exhibition program, comes from The C.F. Foundation, Atlanta.
Delaware Art Museum Curator: Heather Campbell Coyle, Curator of American Art

Edward Koren: The Capricious Line

June 25 – September 18, 2016
On view in The Anthony N. and Catherine A. Fusco Gallery (Gallery 10)

This exhibition celebrates the career of Edward Koren (born 1935)–renowned cartoonist, graphic satirist, and long-standing contributor to The New Yorker. Through approximately 50 original pen-and-ink, watercolor, and pencil cartoons–on tour for the first time–Koren deftly articulates the neuroses of contemporary society with his distinctive drawing style, relatable characters, and wry criticism. The Capricious Line not only highlights the accomplishments of this master cartoonist but also asserts his status as an artist. These innovative illustrations demonstrate the psychological, philosophical, and comical talents of Koren’s pen. The exhibition complements the Museum’s extensive holdings of American illustration from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, on view in the permanent collection galleries.

Edward Koren: The Capricious Line is curated by Diane Fane and David Rosand, developed by the Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Gallery, New York, and organized for tour by International Arts & Artists, Washington, DC.
Delaware Art Museum curator: Mary F. Holahan, Curator of Illustration / Curator of Outlooks Exhibitions

Dark Humor: African American Art from the University of Delaware

July 16 – September 25, 2016
On view in Gallery 9

The term “black humor”–also known as “dark humor”–was coined by surrealist André Breton in 1935 to designate a subgenre of comedy in which pleasure arises from topics generally considered taboo. Dark Humor: African American Art from the University of Delaware presents work by contemporary black artists who employ this type of subversive humor to question the currency of cultural and racial stereotypes. The show was selected from the African American art collection at the University of Delaware and features paintings and prints produced between 1970 and 2008 by artists, including Camille Billops, David Hammons, Barkley Hendricks, and Peter Williams.

Organized by the Delaware Art Museum
Delaware Art Museum Curator: Tiffany Barber, University of Rochester, the Delaware Art Museum’s 2015 Alfred Appel Jr. Curatorial Fellow

Elizabeth Osborne: The Sixties

October 8, 2016 – January 8, 2017
On view in Gallery 9

Philadelphia-based artist Elizabeth Osborne (born 1936) is best known for her glowing landscapes and seascapes. She is also known for her interior and figurative paintings which were influenced by Richard Diebenkorn and Color Field painters such as Helen Frankenthaler. Following her graduation from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Osborne spent a year in the mid-1960s studying in Paris through the Fulbright Program. This period was of great importance, resulting in the artist’s first mature paintings. Elizabeth Osborne: The Sixties traces the influence of Osborne’s contemporaries, such as Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg, and presents the first survey of the artist’s haunting, black paintings from this decade.

Organized by the Delaware Art Museum
Delaware Art Museum Curator: Margaret Winslow, Associate Curator for Contemporary Art

Truth & Vision: 21st Century Realism

October 22, 2016 – January 22, 2017
On view in The Anthony N. and Catherine A. Fusco Gallery (Gallery 10)

Inspired by Robert C. Jackson’s 2014 publication, Behind the Easel: The Unique Voices of 20 Contemporary Representational Painters, this exhibition surveys the state of realistic painting at the start of the 21st century. Indicative of this moment are two trends in representational painting–the depiction of the natural world and the creation of fantastic imaginings. Featuring artists from throughout the United States and Canada, including Steven Assael, Bo Bartlett, Debra Bermingham, Margaret Bowland, Paul Fenniak, Scott Fraser, Woody Gwyn, F. Scott Hess, Laurie Hogin, Robert C. Jackson, Alan Magee, Janet Monafo, John Moore, Charles Pfahl, Scott Prior, Stone Roberts, Sandra Mendelsohn Rubin, Daniel Sprick, Will Wilson, and Jerome Witkin, Truth & Vision: 21st Century Realism reveals the contemporary developments in a mode of painting historically tied to the greater Brandywine Valley.

Organized by the Delaware Art Museum
Delaware Art Museum Curator: Margaret Winslow, Associate Curator for Contemporary Art

Sponsors and Organizers

Additional support for all exhibitions is provided by grants from the Delaware Division of the Arts, a state agency dedicated to nurturing and supporting the arts in Delaware, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

ABOUT THE DELAWARE ART MUSEUM

Founded in 1912, the Delaware Art Museum is best known for its large collection of works by Wilmington native Howard Pyle and fellow American illustrators, a major collection of British Pre-Raphaelite art, and urban landscapes by John Sloan and his circle. Visitors can also enjoy the outdoor Copeland Sculpture Garden and a number of special exhibitions throughout the year.

The Delaware Art Museum is located at 2301 Kentmere Parkway, Wilmington, DE 19806. Hours: Wednesday: 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m., Thursday: 10:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m., and Friday – Sunday: 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Monday and Tuesday: Closed. Admission fees are charged as follows: Adults (19–59) $12, Seniors (60+) $10, Students (with valid ID) $6, Youth (7–18) $6, and Children (6 and under) free. Admission fees are waived Thursdays after 4:00 p.m. and Sundays thanks to support from generous individuals. For more information, call 302-571-9590 or 866-232-3714 (toll free), or visit the website at delart.org.

 

For more information, contact:

Jessica Jenkins
Manager of Marketing & Public Relations
jjenkins@delart.org
302.351.8558