Puck Illustration Collection, 1876-c.1901

A Finding Aid to the Puck Illustration Collection,

Helen Farr Sloan Library, Delaware Art Museum

Wilmington, Delaware
2004


Extent: 1 linear ft.
Restrictions: Unrestricted
Processed:Sarena Deglin, 2004
Contact Information:

Helen Farr Sloan Library
Delaware Art Museum
2301 Kentmere Parkway
Wilmington, DE 19806

TABLE OF CONTENTS

History of Puck
Scope and Contents Note 
Organization of the Collection
Description of the Collection

 

HISTORY OF PUCK MAGAZINE

Joseph Keppler, a cartoonist working for Frank Leslie’s Illustrated established Puck Magazine in 1876. The name of the magazine was taken from the elfin character in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Up until this time, American humorous journals had been modeled on Punch Magazine. However, Keppler refused to do this and created a different type of magazine. Each week the front-cover of the magazine featured a different cartoon. The centerfold and front and back covers were also in color.

Puck started as a German-language weekly but an English version appeared the following year in March, 1877. The 16-page magazine sold for ten cents. For several years the English language magazine operated at a loss and was subsidized by the German version. However, circulation gradually increased and by the early 1880s Keppler was selling over 80,000 copies a week.

The drawing on the front page of Puck and the double-spread in the middle were political in character, while the one on the back cover usually dealt with social issues. Joseph Keppler had traditional views on the role of women and never tired of poking fun at those involved in the campaign for women’s suffrage. Nor did he show much sympathy for the emerging trade union movement.

At first Keppler drew all the cartoons for Puck. Later Keppler recruited several talented artists including Frederick Opper, James Wales, Livingston Hopkins, Eugene Zimmerman and Bernhard Gillam. It has been argued that Keppler had a great influence on the artistic development of these cartoonists.

Keppler gave certain politicians a hard time in his magazine. Ulysses Grant was attacked for his drinking whereas Rutherford Hayes was criticized for his decision to ban drink from the table in the White House. It has been argued that Puck played a significant role in ensuring that Grover Cleveland defeated James Blaine in the 1884 presidential election. Bernhard Gillam portrayed Blaine as the tattooed man. On Blaine’s body was engraved details of charges of corruption made by his political past. Blaine threatened to sue but was persuaded by his political friends to back down.

Keppler also disapproved of religious hypocrisy. Puck included several cartoons that suggested that the accusations against the preacher, Henry War Beecher, were true. The magazine was also hostile to the Catholic Church and Leo XIII was portrayed unsympathetically after becoming the new pope in 1878. Joseph Pulitzer was another target and responded by trying to buy the magazine.

Joseph Keppler died in 1894 and the magazine was taken over by his son, Joseph Keppler Jr., who was also an cartoonist. Harry Leon Wilson became editor until being replaced in 1904 by John K. Bangs, the former editor ofHarper’s Weekly.

The magazine opposed Theodore Roosevelt and William Taft and supported Woodrow Wilson in 1912. Keppler belied that the United States should fully support the Allies during the First World War. This was reinforced by the employment of Louis Raemaekers who highlighted German atrocities that had been committed in Germany.

The magazine was purchased by William Randolph Hearst in 1917. The magazine became a fortnightly in 1917 and a monthly in March, 1918. This failed to increase sales and Hearst closed Puck in September, 1918.

Sources:

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk 

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SCOPE AND CONTENTS NOTE

The Puck Illustration Collection consists of centerfold, front-cover, and internal illustrations from both the American and German editions, spanning the years 1876-c.1901.

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ORGANIZATION OF THE COLLECTION

Series I. American – Centerfold
Series II. American – Front Covers
Series III. American – Other
Series IV. German – Centerfold
Series V. German – Front Covers
Series VI. German – Other

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DESCRIPTION OF THE COLLECTION

Series I. American – Centerfold

Series I. American – Centerfold, is arranged chronologically.

Illustrator – Caption – Date – Volume:Number – Page Number – Subject

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – “Sic Em.” Mr. Parnell in his Great Feat of Letting Loose the Dogs of War. – October 26, 1881 – pages 119-122 verso.

Rogers, W. A. (William Allen), 1854-1931 – It Will Be Open. Bigotry and Intolerance cannot Obstruct the progress of civilization — The World’s Fair will be open on Sunday. – 1892 – page 269 verso.

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The Great Winter Carnival in Culterville. – no date

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – The Declaration of Dependence. Made at Cincinnati, on the 19th of March, in the Year of the Republic 106, by the Fourth Provincial Council of the Roman Catholic Church in the United States. – no date – pages 89-92 verso.

Dalrymple, Louis, 1866-1905 – Coronation of the Autocrat of Protection, June 16, 1896. – no date

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – The U.S. Hotel Badly Needs a “Bouncer” – no date – pages 55-58 verso.

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – A Free Feast for the Congressional Colored Boys — They are All After a slice. – no date – pages 331-334 verso.

Taylor, C.J. (Taylor, Charles Jay), 1855-1929 – Man Makes the Dress. — The Arrival of the Struckile Family at the Swellingtons’ Fancy-Dress Ball. – no date – illustration from “The Christmas Puck”

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – On the Union Pond. The Mischief-Makers can’t spoil the Sport — the Ice is too Thick. – no date

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Series II. American – Front

Series II. American – Front, is arranged chronologically.

Illustrator – Caption – Date – Volume:Number – Page Number – Subject

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – A Stir in the Roost. “What! Another Chicken?” – March, 1877 – 1:1 – Inaugural issue of PUCK, featuring PUCK amongst and attracting the attention of other contemporary news publications such as the New York Herald, Harper’s Weekly, New York World-Telegram, Leslie’s Illustrated Weekly, New York Evening Post, New York Times.

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – “The Country is in a Dreadful State!” – March, 1877 – 1:2 – Rutherford B. Hayes, 1822-1893; Cameron, Simon, 1799-1889.

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – The Trouble in the East. Puck sends his special artist-correspondent, fully equipped, to the seat of war. – May, 1877 – 1:8

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – The Great American Dauber at Work. – May, 1877 – 1:11 – PUCK crowning Rutherford B. Hayes with a jesters hat, while Hayes paints a shining image of his portrait in the front page of The Sun, May 15, 1877.

Murphy – The Model Temperance Orator. – July 18, 1877 – 1:19

Unknown artist – H. W. B. – “The Man Who Can’t Live On Bread and Water is Not Fit to Live!” – August 8, 1877 – 1:22 – Beecher, Henry Ward, 1813-1887

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – Diogenes Conkling Finds His Honest Man. – August 22, 1877 – 1:24

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – True Inwardness for Utah. H. W. B. sees by the Herald that Brigham Young leaves no successor, and promptly strikes for Salt Lake City, leaving Brooklyn disconsolate. – September 5, 1877 – 1:26 – Beecher, Henry Ward, 1813-1887

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – How the Tammany Appetite is Appeased. – September 12, 1877 – 2:27 – Kelly, John, 1822-1886; Tammany Society, or Columbian Order (N.Y.)

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – Dana’s Trojan Horse. Dana: “If recruits don’t come in faster than this, we’ll have to shut up the Show!” – September 19, 1877 – 2:28

Unknown artist – Led By the Nose. – The Situation in France. – October 3, 1877 – 2:30

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – Freedom of the Ballot, As Interpreted by Street Railroad Companies. – November 14, 1877 – 2:36

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – The Sword of Damocles. – December 5, 1877 – 2:39

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – Got Him! – December 12, 1877 – 2:40

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – The City and the Law. – December 19, 1877 – 2:41

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – Mayor Smith Ely Weakens on Himself. – January 9, 1878 – 2:44

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – A Puzzle Picture: “Where is the Pope?” – February 13, 1878 – 2:49

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – The Crime of the 28th of February, 1878. – March 6, 1878 – 2:52

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – Out of the Fold. “Oh, dreadful! They dwell in peace and harmony, and have no church scandals. They must be wiped out.” – February 26, 1879 – 4:103 – Oneida Community.

Wales, James Albert, 1852-1886 – The Two Machines. Engineer Conkling: — “Look here, Kelly, my machine won’t pump at all, and yours — ! Why, yours is only fit for scrap iron!’ – October 1, 1879 – 6:134 – Conkling, Roscoe, 1829-1888; Kelly, John, 1822-1886; Tammany Society, or Columbian Order (N.Y.)

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – Political Baby Farming: — How to Tell ‘Tother From Which. – October 15, 1879 – 6:136 – Tammany Society, or Columbian Order (N.Y.)

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – Police Commissioners’ Euchre — Make It Next! He polished their heads so carefully, that now he is the ruler of the S.C.B. – December 24, 1879 – 6:146

Unknown artist – Too Many Drivers. – January 21, 1880 – 6:150 – Blaine, James Gillespie, 1830-1893; Garcelon, Alonzo, 1813-1906; Elections, Maine

Wales, James Albert, 1852-1886 – Dangerous Characters. – February 4, 1880 – 6:152

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – What Next? If it Goes on like This, will not the Gallows-Candidates Crowd Out the Professional, Lecturers? – March 31, 1880 – 7:160 – A man hanging on the gallows, accused of murder, attracts substantial attention fame and financial investment.

Wales, James Albert, 1852-1886 – A Dead Hero and a Live Jackass. – June 22, 1881 – 9:224 – Jefferson Davis sitting outside the secession cemetery, one hand holding a book entitled “History of Treason by an Ex-Traitor,” the other grasping coins in a bag (history of treason profits). A statue of Abraham Lincoln is in close proximity of Davis.

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Bounced Again! – August 31, 1881 – 9:234

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – This is not a Scene From l’Assommoir, nor does it Represent a Man with the Hydrophobia; it is Our Comic Artist, Who Has Been Told to Get up “Something New” about Thanksgiving. – November 23, 1881 – 10:246

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – Arthur’s Awkward “White Elephant.” “How shall I ever get rid of him? It won’t do for me to have him on my hands in 1884!” – March 15, 1882 – 11:262 – President Chester Arthur sits on a rock outside the Supreme Court Building, deep in thought as to how to best handle his debts to Roscoe Conkling, represented by a large white elephant, centered in the illustration and demanding in presence. Refusing both a position on the Supreme Court and to take office, Roscoe was rumored to run for the 1884 presidential election, as a rival to incumbent President Arthur; Arthur, Chester Alan, 1829-1886; Conkling, Roscoe, 1829-1888.

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – Hyenas at Work. – March 22, 1882 – 11:263 – Journalistic and political hyenas are digging up the grave of recently assassinated President James A. Garfield, searching for newsworthy slander; Garfield, James A. (James Abram), 1831-1881.

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – Hyenas at Work. – March 22, 1882 – 11:263 – duplicate

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – Another Restorer of Antiquities a la Cesnola. C.A. Dana (having excavated an Old Fossil): — “I guess I can palm him off on the people for their Museum in 1884!” – April 5, 1882 – 11:265 – Tools (wire-pulling, editorials, newspaper cement) and pieces of sculptural remnants (new political footing, popular enthusiasm) surround C. D. Dana, who contemplates appending these pieces to the broken sculpture of Samuel Tilden, which he will later dispose of to the “Museum” (the White House) in the 1884 presidential election. A copy of The Sun, stuffed in Dana’s back pocket, alludes to the propaganda in favor of Tilden published in the periodical in order to restore Tilden, “The Sage of Graystone” from an old and broken work of art into a good presidential candidate. Commentary on the charges against Luigi Palma Di Cesnola, custodian of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, for forging false sculptures out of non-homogeneous material and presenting the statues to the public as authentic antiquities. The charges, which appeared in New York art journals and the daily press, were referred to a committee of five men who declared them groundless. Mr. Gaston L. Feuardent later appealed a libel suit against Mr. Cesnola, which, after a prolonged trial, resulting in a disagreement of the jury. This case attracted great attention on account of the extreme partisanship shown by the newspapers during the trial; Dana, Charles A. (Charles Anderson), 1819-1897

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – Between Two Evils. The Temporary Man: — “I want nothing to do with either of you!” – April 19, 1882 – 11:267

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Self-Supporter Sammy. “Mr. Tilden will not support any candidate whom he has not personally selected.” — Daily Paper. – May 10, 1882 – 11:270 – Two aging Samuel Tildens, dressed identically, are on either side of a barrel loaded with money. Sticking out the back pocket of each Tilden is a sheet of paper that says: “For president, S.J. Tilden. For Governor, S.J. Tilden.” Commentary on Tilden’s attempt to support political candidates who he selects, namely, himself. PUCK anticipates Tilden to run for office continuously until his death; Tilden, Samuel J. (Samuel Jones), 1814-1886

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – A Sop to Cerberus. – May 17, 1882 – 11:271 – President Chester Arthur dressed in white robes offering a three-headed dog, representing the Western Vote (Hoodlum, Demagogue and Irish) the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. The three-headed dog blocks the pathway to the White House, glowing with the number 1884. President Chester Arthur with political aspirations for a second term in office, offers a sop to pacify the three-headed dog of mythology (Cereberus) the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 in order to tame the wild beast, which will allow Arthur to claim victory in the 1884 presidential elections.

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – A Sop to Cerberus. – May 17, 1882 – 11:271 – duplicate

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – Justice’s “Jimmy.” How the Receivers get at the Assets of “Busted” Insurance Companies. – May 24, 1882 – 11:272

Graetz, F. (Friedrich), ca. 1840-ca. 1913 – John Kelly Galvanizes the Corpse of Tammany – May 31, 1882 – 11:273 – Figure of Tammany Hall lies in its casket, having died in 1880, though it has not rotted but was carefully embalmed and deposited in a handsome casket, and attired in its most picturesque Indian garments. With help of Governor Cornell and the Republican Party and machine apparatus, John Kelly constructed a galvanic battery. So long as he turns the crank, the Tammany corpse will be lively enough; but when that stops, the circuit will cease and it will be deader than ever.

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The Innocents. “He hain’t seen nuffin o’ yer chickens — he’s as innercent as we is!” – June 7, 1882 – 11:274 – Central figure of a dark-skinned man/boy dressed in rags, wearing hat entitled “judge whitewashed,” surrounded by four similarly fashioned men on each side, each wearing a hat entitled “whitewasher No.1,” “whitewasher No. 2,” and so on. All are standing outside the capital at Albany. Commentary on the corrupt Albany legislature.

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – The Mighty Meeting of the Masons. When one’s a Mason, However snide, He must aprons place on And collars wide. Then he’ll pass from “Labor” – Which is swopping grips, With his “brother” neighbor, To “Refreshment” — nips. – June 14, 1882 – 11:275 – Four white-skinned men dressed in Freemanson clothing stand as if stepping forward in unison, between two poles labeled “Boaz and “Jachin.” Commentary on freemasonry.

Graetz, F. (Friedrich), ca. 1840-ca. 1913 – Too Weak to Fight — Too Old to Run – June 21, 1882 – 11:276 – William E. Galdstone, dressed in dress and bonnet of a woman, rides the back of the British Lion, panting in distress as they flee from the British Consul in Egypt with Egyptian men in tow. Commentary on the British occupation of Egypt in 1882; Egypt, History, British occupation, 1882-1936; Gladstone, W. E. (William Ewart), 1809-1898, Caricatures and cartoons.

Graetz, F. (Friedrich), ca. 1840-ca. 1913 – Too Weak to Fight — Too Old to Run – June 21, 1882 – 11:276 – duplicate

Graetz, F. (Friedrich), ca. 1840-ca. 1913 – Getting Hot Enough For Him. – July 5, 1882 – 11:278 – Chester Arthur sitting on beach sweating under the blazing heat applied by the Disunion of the Republican Party, represented by the Stalwarts, Independents, Anti-Monopolists, Half-Breeds, Tariff Reformer, and Civil Service Reformer. Commentary on diverging pressures applied to Arthur by the various factions within the Republican Party.

Graetz, F. (Friedrich), ca. 1840-ca. 1913 – The Agony of the Assessed. — Between Two Terrors. – July 12, 1882 – 11:279 – G.W. Curtis, representing Civil Service Reform Association presenting opposing demands than Jay Hubbell, representing Republican Congressional Committee, to figure of office-holder seated in between the two imposing figures, tearing at his hair in exasperation; Civil Service Reform Association (New York, N.Y.); Republican Congressional Committee

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – British Benevolence. “It is painful to be obliged to use force against the weak.” — Earl Granville in House of Lords – July 19, 1882 – 11:280 – Central figure is the British Lion, one fist representing the Navy, the other the Army, bullying an Egyptian, Ashantee, Afghan, Boer, and Zulu with a Fenian at his heal. Commentary on success of the British in using force against weaker nations.

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – British Benevolence. “It is painful to be obliged to use force against the weak.” — Earl Granville in House of Lords. – July 19, 1882 – 11:280 – duplicate

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – The Irrepressible Log. Democratic Bear: — “If it wasn’t for that Log, I’d have had that honey long ago, and the more I thrust it away the harder it hits me!” – August 16, 1882 – 11:284 – John Kelly, with his 60,000 Tammany voters, blocks up the state hive of wild honey patronage, and the Democratic Bear proper, finds, in pushing the obstruction back, that the weight pendulously swings back against his paws.

Graetz, F. (Friedrich), ca. 1840-ca. 1913 – For Sale Again. John Kelly: — Here You Are! I’ll Sell to Anybody Else, Except “Blind Pool Men.” How Much for the Lot? – August 30, 1882 – 11:286 – Figure of John Kelly carrying a large basket of 27,000 votes to sell to men reading various newspapers on a New York train.

Graetz, F. (Friedrich), ca. 1840-ca. 1913 – For Sale Again. John Kelly: — Here You Are! I’ll Sell to Anybody Else, Except “Blind Pool Men.” How Much for the Lot? – August 30, 1882 – 11:286 – duplicate

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – The Great American Quack. A Good Remedy in Bad Hands. – September 6, 1882 – 12:287 – Wadsworth standing on rear of pushcart (Herald medicine-wagon), selling Panacea Wadsworthine. Leaflets of this “Great Herald Cure” litter the street outside the Republican headquarters. Conkling stands by with horse in tow. Commentary on The Herald’s failure to advocate a candidate successfully and Wadsworth’s disappointment at being neither elected nor nominated as governor of New York.

Graetz, F. (Friedrich), ca. 1840-ca. 1913 – Bullets and Bull’s Eyes. Puck. — Fire away, my boys, and don’t let your friendship cease with your shooting. – September 13, 1882 – 12:288 – United States, represented by figure of the Bald Eagle in embrace with Britain, represented by figure of the British Lion. Each is dressed in patriotic garb of their respective countries, each aiming a gun at a target of each other’s countries. (Britain aiming at New World; United States aiming at Old World.) Figure of PUCK sits aside watching the spectacle. Banner for Creedmoor crowns the scene. Commentary on International Rifle-Match to take place at Creedmoor, Long Island, New York, between British and American rifle men.

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – The Merry Star Routers. Puck: — He laughed too, and yet he died in the penitentiary! – September 20, 1882 – 12:289 – PUCK pointing toward an illustration of W.M. Tweed and Tammany Hall, Tweed laughing in the presence of the figure Justice. To PUCK’s right sits a man, still laughing, this time sitting before the penitentiary where he died in 1875. Beside this man lies a bag entitled “$oap for Juries” with the name [Senator] Dorsey’s attached. TO PUCK’s left sits a second man, with a similar bag entitled “$oap for Witnesses” and the name [Assistant Postmaster] Brady’s attached. A leaflet litters the ground with the type: Miscarriage of justice: 9 for guilty, 3 for not guilty; Brady, Thomas Jefferson, 1876-1981; Dorsey, Stephen W., 1842-1916

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – Something Has Turned Up! Massachusetts Democracy: — I — nev — er — will desert Mr.Micawber. – September 27, 1882 – 12:290 – Benjamin Butler stands, with his hat off and a tear in his eye, before a woman and several children representing the Massachusetts democracy, as he receives the Democratic nomination for Massachusetts’s governor; Butler, Benjamin Franklin, 1818-1893; Dickens, Charles, 1812-1870, David Copperfield; Micawber, Wilkins (Fictitious character), 1890-1900.

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Politics in the Pulpit. If Our Ministers MUST Preach Political Sermons, Puck Advises Them to Get Some Points from Brother John Kelly. – October 26, 1882 – 12:294 – John Kelly preaches to a number of men listening attentively while taking notes. Stained glass windows of Saints Tweed, Sweeny and Connolly shine light into the room.

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – The Angel of Resurrection. At the Sound of THIS Trumpet They All Will Rise from the Dead! – November 8, 1882 – 12:296 – The figure of Democracy blows a horn, awakening spirits of leaders from the Democratic cemetery such as John T. Hoffman, Lucius Robinson and Samuel Tilden.

Graetz, F. (Friedrich), ca. 1840-ca. 1913 – Occupation for the Grand Old Party During its Retirement. – November 15, 1882 – 12:297 – An elderly woman dressed in tattered clothing (the “grandmother old Republican party”) sits on a rocking chair knitting a giant sock for the independent newspaper out of the yarn of civil service reform. Commentary on the recent victory of the Democratic Party in 1882 elections (New York, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Michigan, Indiana, etc.) and the plans of the Republican Party during its “retirement.”

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – Staked And — Lost. – November 22, 1882 – 12:298 – President Arthur is sitting at gambling table in defeat as his public “confidence,” “popular respect,” “prestige,” and “honor” is taken away from him by the “Independents.” His bag for “Hopes of a 2nd term” lies empty by his side on the floor. Commentary of Arthur’s nomination of Secretary Charles J. Folger for governor of New York and resulting loss of support and confidence of the Republican Party for his potential re-election in 1884; Charles J. Folger, 1818-1884

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – A New Attraction at the National Museum. – December 6, 1882 – 12:300 – PUCK and others stand in line to enter the National Museum and see an exhibit of a highly emaciated man, the “Democratic Living Skeleton.” A very large woman (the “Republican Fat Woman”) walks by the exhibit, carrying a bag full of spoils of the Republican Party.

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The Latest Novelty. “The Gould Game.” — Kick Him Out of the Front Door, and He Comes in at the Back. – January 10, 1883 – 12:305 – A wooden toy representation of Jay Gould is destined to enter the Back Door of the Court House, only to be kicked out the Front Door by the boot of the reigning judge. An oiling can of the World Editorials lubricates the toy to keep the cycle in motion. Commentary on the litigation between Gould and the telegraph suits.

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Spoiling Their Slide. – January 17, 1883 – 12:306 – Massachusetts Governor Butler scoops salt on the path of children playing in the snow. The salt represents censure, exposure, desire for reform and criticism. The children represent superfluous government employees, manager of insane asylum, factory employee, army snob and others. The children are playing on the “slide of public mismanagement.” Commentary on Butler’s initial actions as the newly elected governor and public response.

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Congressional Contempt. Republican Congressman: — “He is howling for help.” — — Monopolist: — “Throw him a promise!” – January 31, 1883 – 12:308 – A man (tax payer) sinks through a hole (needless taxation) in a skating pond grasping for something to hold onto while a figurative Republican and a Monopolist skate by nonchalantly, each with two hands on a common cane (money interest) and Democracy skates his way as well. Commentary on the mutual bond between monopolists and Republicans in Congress; Democrats who can do nothing for themselves or anyone else until they get into power; and the taxpayer who suffers.

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – Another One Gone Wrong. New York Mistress: — “Want a new Charter, do you? Take care, or I’ll put you up there with the others!” – February 21, 1883 – 12:311 – John Kelly dressed in the clothing of a woman, with the New York Legislature under his belt and the New York Board of Alderman in his left hand, scolds a child-size Mayor Edson, threatening punishment in a jar on a countertop as are E. Cooper and W.R. Grace. Commentary on Kelly’s response to a new charter for the City of New York proposed by Mayor Edson. Cooper and Grace proposed similar charters and were punished to “oblivion” by Kelly and his Tammany friends; Grace, William Russell, 1832-1904; Cooper, Edward; Edson, Franklin

Graetz, F. (Friedrich), ca. 1840-ca. 1913 – An Appalling Attempt to Muzzle the Watch-Dog of Science. “The Society for the Suppression of Blasphemous Literature proposes to get up cases against Professors Huxley and Tyndall, Herbert Spencer, and others who, by their writings, have sown widespread unbelief, and in some cases rank atheism.” Tel. London, March 5, 1883. – March 14, 1883 – 13:314 – The head of Herbert Spencer is affixed to the body of a giant dog, lying outside a building with the word “science” shining through the doors to the outside. A pole is in place to Spencer’s left, waiving the flag “Freedom of Thought.” A number of men dressed in black trench coats and black top hats attempt to place a muzzle on Spencer. Commentary on the actions of London’s Society for the Suppression of Blasphemous Literature against thinkers such as Spencer, Huxley, Tyndall and Darwin; Spencer, Herbert, 1820-1903

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – “Me and Jack.” – July 2, 1884 – 15:382 – A man in a swimsuit sits leaning against an upright-seated black colored dog. The two sit on a plank with the man’s feet and the dog’s tail dipped into the water. The man is tattooed with the words “N. Pacific Bonds,” “Guano Statesmanship,” Mulligan,” etc. the dog has a bucket tied to its tail; the bucket is labeled “pro-slavery.” Beside the two toward land is a box of soap: Hurray Soap-to remove tattoo; Presidential elections, 1884

Unknown artist – How the “Herald” Does It. Instantaneous Sketch by Puck’s Special Artist of the HERALD’S Special Correspondent Getting his Important Information about the Czar and Gen. Obrutscheff. – May 6, 1885 – 17:426 – A correspondent of The Herald sneaks in through a trapdoor to eavesdrop with his extra-large ear on two Russian officials, the Czar and General Obrutscheff, as they review a map. The map is illustrated with the British Lion roaring at a Russian bear, with Afghanistan shaped like a lamb in between the two disputing landmasses. Commentary of the press’s coverage of and the dispute over Afghanistan between Tsarist Russia and England.

Unknown artist – A Way Out of the Sunday Difficulty. Baffled Policeman. — Bedad, I can’t arrest a machine! – June 2, 1887 – 21:534 – A crowd of men shoves in line for pay a nickel to a machine in return for a mug of beer. A policeman stands by, bewildered that there is nothing he can do.

Taylor, C.J. (Taylor, Charles Jay), 1855-1929 – The Flying-Wheel of France. — Every One Has His Turn at the Top. – April 25, 1888 – 23:581 – Lady France merrily cranks a ferris wheel loaded with men of various ideologies exalting to be at the top and downtrodden to be at the bottom.

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The Two Silly Billies and the Hard Stone Wall. – May 16, 1888 – 23:584 – Charles A Dana and Joseph Pulitzer, each with the body of goats, charge against a solid stone wall representing “Cleveland’s popularity.” Their horns break in the process. The dome of the capital building is seen in the distance; Dana, Charles A. (Charles Anderson), 1819-1897; Pulitzer, Joseph, 1847-1911

Taylor, C.J. (Taylor, Charles Jay), 1855-1929 – The Grand Old Elephant. Manager Platt (of the Pivotal State). — Here! Look lively! Get up and dance for Monopoly and High Tariff! – June 27, 1888 – 23:590 – Platt prods a large elephant (Republican Party), wearing a bandage around its head marked 1884 and muffs on its tusks, to get up and appeal to the monopolists and supporters of high tariffs, preparing for the 1888 presidential election.

Keppler – The New Sign. – July 18, 1888 – 23:593

Taylor, C.J. (Taylor, Charles Jay), 1855-1929 – “They Never Speak As They Pass By.” – August 1, 1888 – 23:595 – Two identical men pass each other, never speaking. One man wears his clothing clean and pressed; his top hat starched and his head high. His sign reads, Republican platform, 1884. The Republican Party pledges itself to correct the inequalities of the TARIFF and to reduce the Surplus.” The other man’s clothing is oversized, wrinkled, his shoes blackened and his hat slumped. Two feathers poke out of his hat: “Temperance” and “Morality.” His sign reads, “1888. We favor the entire repeal of internal taxes (meaning FREE WHISKEY) rather than the surrender of any part of our Protective System.”

Dalrymple, Louis, 1866-1905 – The Greatest American Statesman. — How He Studied the Condition of the English Laborer. – September 5, 1888 – 24:600

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The Downfall of the “Thunderer.” John Bull. — Bless my bloomin’ heyes! – March 13, 1889 – 25:627 – John Bull, standing in the center of a circle of little dancing man, looks down at a hole in the ground with a puzzled look. The sign to the hole reads: Publication Office of the London Times.

Ehrhart, S. D. (Samuel D.), ca. 1862-ca. 1920 – Modern. Mrs. Newgurl (to Daughter). — Goodness me, Kitty! Don’t stand there with your hands in your pockets that way; — you don’t know how ungentlemanly it looks! – April 17, 1895 – 37:945 – An elderly woman, sitting in her chair reading, comments on the attire of her daughter, who is standing before her mother wearing pants, dressed like a man of her time.

Ehrhart, S. D. (Samuel D.), ca. 1862-ca. 1920 – The “New Journalism” Beats Him. Dime Novel Writers. — And they used to say that my books were bad for young peoples’ morals! – March 17, 1897 – 41:1045 – A man, draped in a trench coat and top hat, looks quizzically at two young children as they read newspapers reporting local murders and crimes. Each child, a boy and a girl, is dressed in adult fashion.

Dalrymple, Louis, 1866-1905 – The New Field of Labor for the Up-to-Date Divine. Obliging and “Disinterested” Endorsement, at the Service of Every Advertiser Who Applies to Him. – April 28, 1897 – 41:1051 – A man, Rev. Dr. N. Dorser sits at his desk while he endorses numerous causes.

Taylor, C.J. (Taylor, Charles Jay), 1855-1929 – Lohengrin Reed is Wanted in New York. The Republican Elsa Would Galdly be Rescued from Her Oppressors. – December 15, 1897 – 42:1084

Pughe, J. S. (John S.), 1870-1909 – What He Wants to See, Be Gosh! The New York Up-Country Legislator Will Never Be Satisfied Until He Has Taxed the Millionaire Out of the State. – October 26, 1898 – 46:1129

Keppler, Udo J., 1872-1956 – Professor Hadley Wants Ideals in Politics — What’s the Matter with These? – January 24, 1900 – 46:1194

Nankivell, Frank A. (Frank Arthur), 1869-1959 – A First-Class Lie. Englishman. — You have some pretty high buildings in Chicago, have n’t you? Chicagoan (in London). — Well, I should remark! Why, the tops of some of them are covered with snow – January 21, 1900 – 46:1195

Nankivell, Frank A. (Frank Arthur), 1869-1959 – Catching the Celestial Ballot. Clancy. — I wonder whoi Washington wore a pig-tail? Casey. — Sure, Oi dunno! Mebby Chinamin hod votes in thim days! – February 21, 1900 – 47:1198

Glackens, L. M. (Louis M.) 1866-1933 – A Flirtation. Britannia. — I love you so! Pat. — Begorra, Ma’am, this is very suddint! – April 18, 1900 – 47:1206

Nankivell, Frank A. (Frank Arthur), 1869-1959 – Evidently Newly Wed. Mrs. Sharpe (severely). — Norah, I can find only seven on these plates. Where are the other five? Cook (in surprise). — Sure, Mum, don’t yez make no allowances for ordinary wear an’ tear? – May 22, 1901 – 49:1264

 

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Series III. American – Other

Series III. American – Other, is divided by illustrator, alphabetical by caption.

Illustrator – Caption – Date – Volume:Number – Page Number – Subject


Illustrated by Dalrymple

Dalrymple, Louis, 1866-1905 – A Bad Break for the Republican Sheep. Shepherd Cleveland. — Well, if they will leave the good, safe road they have traveled so long, there is no help for them! – page 451 verso; color

Dalrymple, Louis, 1866-1905 – Even If He Had No Other Reason. Uncle Sam (to pro-Boer crank). — I can’t throw that stone; — I’m living in a glass house myself. – c.1900 – color

Dalrymple, Louis, 1866-1905 – The Man in the Glass House Who Has Been Throwing Stones at Us. – August 17, 1898 – color


Illustrated by Fisher

Fisher, Harrison, 1875-1934 – After the Ceremony. Miss Innit. — Why do women always cry at a wedding, Mama? Mrs. Innit. — The married ones cry, my child, because they know how it is themselves, and the unmarried ones because they don’t. – c.1898 – color

Fisher, Harrison, 1875-1934 – Ample Time for Jack-Pots. Bluchip. — Is n’t it in Lapland that the nights are several months long? Bluffer. — Yes. Would n’t it be a great place for a poker game! – c.1898 – brown and white


Illustrated by Flagg

Flagg, James Montgomery, 1877-1960 – The Submarine Cable Road. – c.1890s – is this PUCK? – green, black, and white color


Illustrated by Gillam

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – The Echo From the Rocks. Republican Party (in despair): — “Oh, by what means can I ever reach Harmony!” — Echo: — “Money!” – c.1880s – page 223 verso, color

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – John Kelly’s “Man Friday.” – 1883 – page 319 verso; color

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – The Lesson of the Floods. Leatherstocking, the Protecting Spirit of the Woods: — “Cut down yonder fence; but spare my scanty forests!” – c.1880s – page 415 verso; color

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – Setting the Ball A-Rolling. – c.1880s – page 271 verso; color

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – An Unfinished Work. – 1883 – page 305 verso; color


Illustrated by Glackens

Glackens, L. M. (Louis M.) 1866-1933 – The Favorite. Little Johnny Doubledoo / Ain’t as big as me or you! / But they say he ‘s awful smart / ‘Cause he speaks a piece by heart. / He can stn’ up an’ recite / That about Horashus’ fight, / An’ he don’t forget a line, An’ the teacher thinks it ‘s fine! / ‘Stead of bein’ good at sums, / Wisht, when Friday program comes, / Teacher ‘d like to call on me, / Jes’ so vis’tors all might see! – Edwin L. Sabin. – c.1890s – color

Glackens, L. M. (Louis M.) 1866-1933 – “Old Thursday.” [Poem by Victor A. Hermann.] – c.1890s – color both sides

Glackens, L. M. (Louis M.) 1866-1933 – Rollo Breaks Up the Natural History Class By Bringing in a New Specimen. – c.1901 – color


Illustrated by Graetz

Graetz, F. (Friedrich), ca. 1840-ca. 1913 – The Assessment Mania in the Hubbell Family. – 1882 – page 355 verso; color

Graetz, F. (Friedrich), ca. 1840-ca. 1913 – Brevet-Colonel Mapleson’s Brigade. – c.1880s – page 223 verso; color

Graetz, F. (Friedrich), ca. 1840-ca. 1913 – The Children’s Carnival — The Fashionable Slaughter of the Innocents. – 1883 – page 351 verso; color

Graetz, F. (Friedrich), ca. 1840-ca. 1913 – Driven Into Exile. – c.1882 – page 51 verso; color

Graetz, F. (Friedrich), ca. 1840-ca. 1913 – How To Dispose of the Remains of Our Navy. – c.1880s – page 177 verso; color

Graetz, F. (Friedrich), ca. 1840-ca. 1913 – An Irrepressible Patriot. How General Skobeleff Keeps the Crowned Heads Busy. – c.1880s – page 97 verso; color; duplicate

Graetz, F. (Friedrich), ca. 1840-ca. 1913 – An Irrepressible Patriot. How General Skobeleff Keeps the Crowned Heads Busy. – c.1880s – page 97 verso; color; duplicate

Graetz, F. (Friedrich), ca. 1840-ca. 1913 – Left Alone to Blow it Out. – 1882 – page 371 verso; color

Graetz, F. (Friedrich), ca. 1840-ca. 1913 – Midsummer Madness. – c.1880s – page 403 verso; color

Graetz, F. (Friedrich), ca. 1840-ca. 1913 – Oriental Game. France: — “Sacre! When it does drop, you will get the lion’s share.” England: — “That’s what I am here for!” – c.1882 – page 227 verso; color

Graetz, F. (Friedrich), ca. 1840-ca. 1913 – A Sensation at the Sea-Side. Brother Talmage: — “I wonder why the people are all so frightened — there must be a Shark around somewhere!” – c.1880s – page 339 verso; color

Graetz, F. (Friedrich), ca. 1840-ca. 1913 – Tit for Tat. Uncle Sam to Bismarck: — “If you hit my swine, I’ll have a crack at your wine!” – c.1880s – page 387 verso; color
Illustrated by Howarth

Howarth, F.M. (Howarth, Franklin Morris), 1870- – A Money-Saving Accident. – c.1899 – color
Illustrated by Keppler

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – As the Singers are to be Invisible, How Would it do to Have the Voices Labeled with Characteristic Portraits, As Above? – c.1878 – page 15 verso; black and white

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – “Blow Winds and Crack Your Cheeks!” Puck (to Hayes): “Never fear, that gale will soon blow over.” – c.1877 – page 15 verso; yellow black color

Keppler, Udo J., 1872-1956 – The Captive Conqueror. – c.1890s – color

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – Civilization. – c. 1878 – page 10 verso; yellow-black color

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – The Collapse of Two Great Statesmen. Bismarck Turns to the Pope for Help, and Gladstone Turns to Parnell. – c.1882 – page 161 verso; color; duplicate

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – The Collapse of Two Great Statesmen. Bismarck Turns to the Pope for Help, and Gladstone Turns to Parnell. – c.1882 – page 161 verso; color; duplicate

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – Columbia: “By all that’s addled! That’s a pretty chicken!” – c.1877 – page 15 verso; yellow black color

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – The Financial Situation. – c.1878 – page 15 verso; black and white

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – c. 1878 – In The Nineties. – page 15 verso; black and white

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – The Latter-Day Style of Bank Burglary (In Chicago and Elsewhere). – c. 1878 – page 15 verso; yellow black color

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – The Murderous Policy of the “L” Roads. -c.1879 – page 463 verso; color

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – Old Tammany (Tweed) Draws Young Tammany’s (Kelly’s) Chestnuts Out of the Fire. – c.1877] – page 15 verso; yellow black color

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – The Papal Farm. The Craze for Religious Colonization. – c. 1879 – page 298 verso; black and white

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – Puck Among the Nez Perces. Puck: “Why is it, great Chief, that thy warriors thus rejoice?” Chief Joseph: — “Great Father make pale-face warrior Howard stay, fight! Red man heap glad!” – c.1878 – page 15 verso; black and white

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – The Republican Dalilah stealthily deprives the Democratic Sampson of his Strength. – c.1880s – page 167 verso; color


Illustrated by Latham

Administrative note: Rose Cecil O’Neill Latham (1874-1944) signed her work O’Neill Latham, 1896-1901.

O’Neill Latham – The Church Fair. [Poem by Joe Lincoln.] – c.1900 – color

O’Neill Latham – The Divinity of the Season. [Poem by Edwin L. Sabin.] – c.1900 – color

O’Neill Latham – Grand Opera. First Philistine. – Why so much of this recitative? Why don’t they speak their lines? Second Philistine. – I understand that grand opera artists are never on speaking terms with each other. – c.1900 – color

O’Neill Latham – An Inherited Opinion. Mrs. Gay. – Well, suppose I was a coquette! There ‘s no great harm in a girl flirting a little before she’s married. The Colonel. – Do you teach your daughter that? Mrs. Gay. – Why, no; — it is n’t necessary! – c.1900 – color

O’Neill Latham – The Proxy of a Saint. [Poem by Edward W. Barnard.] – c.1901 – color

O’Neill Latham – Trouble Ahead. He. – So Kimmy gev yer a Christmas present, did he? She. – Well, kin yer blame him? He. – No, I don’t blame him; but when I see him I ‘ll slug him! – c.1900 – color

O’Neill Latham – To Vain Roses and Ladies. [Poem by O'Neill Latham.] – c.1898 – color both sides
Illustrated by Nankivell

Nankivell, Frank A. (Frank Arthur), 1869-1959 – The Annual Sentence. Society in wig and gown / Sat in the judge’s place; / The sternest kind of legal frown / Upon her charming face. / She sadly shook her pretty head: / “On account of their wicked ways, / The World, the Flesh and the Devil,” she said, / “Are sentenced for forty days!” – Carolyn Wells. – c.1900 – color

Nankivell, Frank A. (Frank Arthur), 1869-1959 – At Buffalo. His niece. – Why, Uncle, I can’t see that this is inferior to the World’s Fair! Mr. Porkchopps (of Chicago). – Maybe not; but you don’t want to let anybody hear you say so! – c.1901 – color

Nankivell, Frank A. (Frank Arthur), 1869-1959 – Puck Easter. [No. 1206] – c.1900 – color

Nankivell, Frank A. (Frank Arthur), 1869-1959 – Suburban Diplomacy. [words torn off] – c.1901 – color
Illustrated by Opper

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The Age of Extravagance.- c.1897 – color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The American Farmer. Various Ideas of Him, from Various Points of View. – c.1896 – color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – As Long as We Have Such Conductors — And Such Passengers –Accidents Will Happen On the Elevated R.R. – 1882 – page 81 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The Biggest Man in Egypt. The New York Herald Correspondent at the Seat of War. – c.1880s – page 323 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – British Detectives. – 1882 – page 211 verso; color; duplicate

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – British Detectives. – 1882 – page 211 verso; color; duplicate

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Buffalo Bill’s “Wild West” Show in England

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Business Brisk. Returning Tourist (to Father Knickerbocker). — I’m delighted to see that my affairs have been prospering here even better than at the watering places! – page 65 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The Charge of the City Cousins — And the “Last Ditch” of the Victimized Farmer. – c.1880s – page 291 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Christmas-Traps for Poor Pater-Familias. – c.1880s – page 257 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Civil Service Reform. Applicants for Keeperships in Our State’s-Prisons and Reformatories Should Be Required to Pass a Competitive Examination. – c.1883 – page 383 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The Codfish Exodus to Europe. – page 177 verso; color; duplicate

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The Codfish Exodus to Europe. – page 177 verso; color; duplicate

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Comstock is Now Suppressing the Wicked Rural Amusement of “Hog-Guessing.” We suggest several other “Games of Chance” that he ought to turn his attention to next. – page 87; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Country Thrift — Making Money While the Sun Shines. – c.1880 – page 387 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Cranks of the Day. — III. The Secret Society Crank. – c.1890s – color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Disturbers of the Public Peace. [more] – c.1880s – page 71 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The Dry Spell. – c.1880s – page 143 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Eccentric Weddings. The newspapers contain frequent accounts of “A Wedding at a Country Fair,” “Married by Telephone,” “Wedded on Horseback,” etc. Here are a few suggestions for novel nuptial ceremonies which would be sure to cover the participants with glory. – page 155 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The Elastic Conscience of the Average “Honest and Upright Citizen.” Inspired by the Anniversary of the Birth of the Father of His Country. – c.1897 – color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – A Fable. A certain Injudicious Ape, dwelling in Equatorial Africa, in a Lofty palm-tree, which he utilized for Acrobatic Performances, was in the habit, when annoyed by the Presence of Iniquitous men and women, of casting Cocoa-nuts at them. This only attracted people the more, and they came Numerously, and Scooped in the Luscious fruit with impious Glee. Moral. – Sensational Sermons make the pulpit an A-1 Advertising medium for Vice. – c.1880s – page 95 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Fired from the Feast. The Harper of Dynamite and Discord not Wanted at the Irish Banquet. – c.1880s – page 143 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The First of May. — Tammany Moves Into Its New Quarters. – c.1880s – page 129 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The Happy Holiday Season. – c.1888 – page 305 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The History of a Joke. – Midsummer Puck – page 359; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – How Heroes Are Made — The Western Desperado’s Eastern Ally. – c.1880s – page 113 verso, color; duplicate

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – How Heroes Are Made — The Western Desperado’s Eastern Ally. – c.1880s – page 113 verso, color; duplicate

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – How Some People Teach Their Children to be Truthful. – 1897 – color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – How to Keep a “Girl” in the Counrty — A Few Hints for Suburban Residents. – c.1890s – color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The Infant Pianist is the Rage. — Now for Other Infant Prodigies. – page 283 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The Irish Skirmishers’ “Blind Pool.” – c.1880s – page 15 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Jay Gould’s Detective Monopoly. Chorus of ALL the Detectives and Postmen in the City: — “Here is your Blackmailer, Mr. Gould! We’d do most anything for a liberal gent like you!” – c.1880s – page 190; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Just As Dangerous Now As Then. – c.1880s – page 287 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The New Arthur. – c.1881 – page 459 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Not Wanted. Landlord. — Sorry, I can’t let you have the house from next March. I prefer tenants without children. – c.1880s – page 173 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – On to the Horse-Pond! — A Decoration Day Procession That the People Would Hail With Delight. – 1882 – page 207 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – “Our Congressman” — Past and Present. – c.1880s – page 15 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Our Religious Weeklies. – 1880 – page 295 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Out Patriot-Crank Abroad. – page 241 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The Patient Private Citizen. He can Smile and Smile, and be a Victim still. – page 403 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Pinder’s Living Pictures. – color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The Seaside Season is Backward and Extra Attractions Are Needed. Puck’s Hint to the Hotel Keepers. – c.1880s – page 307 verso; color; duplicate

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The Seaside Season is Backward and Extra Attractions Are Needed. Puck’s Hint to the Hotel Keepers. – c.1880s – page 307 verso; color; duplicate

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Sountry Thrift — Making Money While the Sun – 1880

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Tapping a Fresh Keg. – c.1880s – page 79 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Uncle Hayseed’s Adventures, No. II. — How He Spent New Year’s Day In the City. – page 323 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Uncle Sam as a “Good Thing” for European Money-Getters. – c.1897 – color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – An Unexpected Chance for a Very Sick Party. Dr. Dana. — “It’s almost too good to hope for, Gentlemen; but I think the “Bad-Republican-Nomination Cordial” may pull the old fellow through yet!” – 1882 – page 239 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – United States — Working for It. Ireland — Waiting for it. American Gold. – c.1880s – page 193 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The Ups and Downs of the Anarchist Newspaper Business. – page 127 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – A Very Dull Race-Meeting — No Public Interest in the Contest. – 1882 – page 63 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Wanted — A Bergh for Poor Humanity. – c.1880s – page 393 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – Weather Vagaries — Fickle June. – 1882 – page 283 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – What He Saw At The Matinee. – c.1880s – page 319 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – When Brute Meets Brute Then Comes the Applause of Curs. – 1882 – page 587 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – When Jay Gould Owns the Associated Press — Puck Will Still Keep His Independent News-Stand. -c.1880s – page 79 verso; color

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – The Wise Precaution of Mr. Gotrox. Mr. Gotrom, Having Made His Will, Leaves with his Lawyer the Above Pictorial Documents, to Prevent the Aforesaid Will from Being Successfully Contested. – c.1897 – color


Illustrated by Pugh

Pughe, J. S. (John S.), 1870-1909 – Just Like Other Girls. First Rooster. — I don’t see anything about that new arrival for all the girls to go crazy over. He is a sight! Second Rooster. — Don’t you know? Why, he was the mascot of the ‘Steenth Regiment and was all through the Santiago campaign! – c.1897 – color

Pughe, J. S. (John S.), 1870-1909 – The Same Old Game. – c.1900 – color


Illustrated by Taylor

Taylor, C.J. (Taylor, Charles Jay), 1855-1929 – The Amazing Growth of the Pension Pig. – c.1887 – page 51 verso; color

Taylor, C.J. (Taylor, Charles Jay), 1855-1929 – Could n’t Place Himself. – c.1897 – color both sides [later edition]

Taylor, C.J. (Taylor, Charles Jay), 1855-1929 – The Maple Tree Inn. [Poem by Richard Stillman Powell] – c.1897 – color both sides [later edition]

Taylor, C.J. (Taylor, Charles Jay), 1855-1929 – Precept and Practice. [Poem by Richard Stillman Powell] – c.1890s – color

Taylor, C.J. (Taylor, Charles Jay), 1855-1929 – The Presidential Donkey-Party. – page 35 verso; color


Illustrated by Wales

Wales, James Albert, 1852-1886 – The Elevated Railway’s Opposition to Clerical Influence. — A Telephonic Hint to the Parsons. – c.1879 – page 271 verso; color

Wales, James Albert, 1852-1886 – In Line At Last. – c.1880 – page 463 verso; color

Wales, James Albert, 1852-1886 – Inconsistent Christianity. “Ho, every one that thirsteth *** and he that hath no money *** come without money and without prize.” Isaiah, Chap. LV. – c. 1879 – page191 verso; black and white

Wales, James Albert, 1852-1886 – It Takes a Long Time to Break a Pet. – 1880 – page 569 verso, color

Wales, James Albert, 1852-1886 – The Modern Builder. – 1880 – page 725 verso; color; duplicate

Wales, James Albert, 1852-1886 – The Modern Builder. – 1880 – page 725 verso; color; duplicate

Wales, James Albert, 1852-1886 – New York’s Dirt and the Way to Get Rid of It. The Citizens Must Literally Take It Into Their Own Hands. – 1880 – page 429 verso; color

Wales, James Albert, 1852-1886 – Our Free Baths. Policeman: — Move up closer, please, and let these gentlemen in. Plenty of room inside! – c.1879 – page 335 verso; color

Wales, James Albert, 1852-1886 – Through Murder to Salvation. – c.1880s – page 451 verso; color

Wales, James Albert, 1852-1886 – West Point Under Its New Commander, General Howard. – c.1880s – color


Illustrator Unknown

Unknown artist – Cupid on Easter. [Poem by O'Neill Latham.] – c.1901 – color

Unknown artist – A Desireable Location. The Governess. — Of course you want to go to heaven, do you not? Little Miss Elite. — Of course! The best people go there. – c.1898 – color

Unknown artist – Fairy Stories. Willy. – When Papa comes home to-night I am going to get him to tell me some fairy stories. Mother. – But, I don’t believe you father knows any. Willy. – Oh! yes, he does! I heard him say to Mr. Jolly, the other day, “By George! Tom, you ought to hear some of the fairy stories I tell my wife!” – c.1898 – color

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Series IV. German – Centerfold


Illustrator – Caption – Date – Volume:Number – Page Number – Subject

Taylor, C.J. (Taylor, Charles Jay), 1855-1929 – [Title] – no date – page 695-698 verso.

 

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Series V. German – Front

Series V. German – Front, is arranged chronologically.

Illustrator – Caption – Date – Volume:Number – Page Number – Subject

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – [Title] – November, 1876 – x:6 – Tweed, William Marcy, 1823-1878.

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – Ein Moderner St. Sebastian – December, 1876 – x:11

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – Puck’s Gallerie Historisch-Allegorischer Bilder. 1) Die Russische Friedensgottin Understanding Ihr – December, 1876 – x:12

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – Desperate Encounter between Bennet & May, (The injuries will be fully reported in a future issue.) – January, 1877 – x:17

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894] – Pleasures of the Season. Wintervernugen. – January, 1877 – x:19

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – Das Erkennen, “Wie Sehr auch die Sonne sein Antlitz berbrannt Das Mutteraug hat ihn doch gleich – March 3, 1877 – x:27 – Corruption, New York (State), New York, 1870-1880; Sweeny, Peter B. (Peter Barr), 1825-1911; Tweed, William Marcy, 1823-1878

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – Bur Situation in Frankreich. [Led By the Nose. - The Situation in France.] – October 3, 1877 – x:54

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – [Title] – October 17, 1877 – x:56 – Kelly, John, 1822-1886

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – [Title] – November 7, 1877 – x:59 – Hayes, Rutherford Birchard, 1822-1893; Cameron, J. D. (James Donald), 1833-1918.

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – In Gefahr. [The Sword of Damocles.] – December 5, 1877 – x:63

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – Aus der New Yorker Berbrederweft. – June 19, 1878 – x:91

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – [Title] – September 11, 1878 – x:103

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – [Title] – October 30, 1878 – x:110 – Corruption, New York (State), New York, 1870-1880; Kelly, John, 1822-1886; Sweeny, Peter B. (Peter Barr), 1825-1911; Tweed, William Marcy, 1823-1878

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – [Title] – January 29, 1879 – x:123

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – [Title] – February 19, 1879 – x:126

Wales, James Albert, 1852-1886 – [Title] – May 21, 1879 – x:139 – Kelly, John, 1822-1886

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – Der neue Fulton Market. … – June 18, 1879 – x:143

Keppler – Des Senators “Greatest Effort of his Life.” – August 20, 1879 – x:152

Keppler – Les Enfants Terribles. – September 20, 1879 – x:157

Keppler – [Title] – November 5, 1879 – x:163

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – [Title] – May 12, 1880 – x:190

Wales, James Albert, 1852-1886 – [Title] – August 11, 1880 – x:203

Wales, James Albert, 1852-1886 – [Title] – September 8, 1880 – x:207

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – [Title] – September 15, 1880 – x:208

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – [Title] – November 17, 1880 – x:217 – Tammany Society, or Columbian Order (N.Y.)

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – [Title] – December 8, 1880 – x:220

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – [Title] – January 12, 1881 – x:225

Wales, James Albert, 1852-1886 – [Title] – July 20, 1881 – x:252

Wales, James Albert, 1852-1886 – [Title] – September 14, 1881 – x:260 – Fox, J.; Irving Hall, Albany, New York; Kelly, John, 1822-1886; Tammany Society, or Columbian Order (N.Y.)

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – [Title] – September 28, 1881 – x:262

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – [Title] – March 1, 1882 – x:284

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – [A Sop to Cerberus.] – May 17, 1882 – x:295

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – [The Innocents. "He hain't seen nuffin o' yer chickens -- he's as innercent as we is!"] – June 7, 1882 – x:298

Graetz, F. (Friedrich), ca. 1840-ca. 1913 – [Too Weak to Fight -- Too Old to Run] – June 21, 1882 – x :300

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – [Title] – August 9, 1882 – x:307

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – [Title] – May 23, 1883 – x:348

Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896 – “Next!” – July 8, 1885 – x:459

Taylor, C.J. (Taylor, Charles Jay), 1855-1929 – [Title] – June 23, 1886 – x:509

Taylor, C.J. (Taylor, Charles Jay), 1855-1929 – [Title] – December 29, 1886 – x:536

Taylor, C.J. (Taylor, Charles Jay), 1855-1929 – [Title] – February 2, 1887 – x:541

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – [Title] – February 9, 1887 – x:542

Taylor, C.J. (Taylor, Charles Jay), 1855-1929 – [Title] – May 25, 1887 – x:557

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – [Title] – June 22, 1887 – x:561

Taylor, C.J. (Taylor, Charles Jay), 1855-1929 – [Title] – July 20, 1887 – x:565

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – [Title] – August 24, 1887 – x:570

Taylor, C.J. (Taylor, Charles Jay), 1855-1929 – [Title] – February 8, 1888 – x:594

Taylor, C.J. (Taylor, Charles Jay), 1855-1929 – [Title] – February 29, 1888 – x:597

Dalrymple, Louis, 1866-1905 – [Title] – March 21, 1888 – x:600

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – [The New Sign.] – July 18, 1888 – x:617

Taylor, C.J. (Taylor, Charles Jay), 1855-1929 – [Title] – September 24, 1890 – x:731

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894 – Der Phonix. – November 26, 1890 – x:740

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – [Title] – April 1, 1891 – x:758

Dalrymple, Louis, 1866-1905 – [Title] – November 8, 1893 – x:894

Taylor, C.J. (Taylor, Charles Jay), 1855-1929 – [Title] – May 9, 1894 – x:920

Taylor, C.J. (Taylor, Charles Jay), 1855-1929 – [Title] – October 23, 1895 – x:996

Pughe, J. S. (John S.), 1870-1909 – [Title] – March 25, 1896 – x:1018

Pughe, J. S. (John S.), 1870-1909 – [Title] – December 2, 1896 – x:1054

Pughe, J. S. (John S.), 1870-1909 – [Title] – June 30, 1897 – x:1084

Unknown artist – Title

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Series VI. German – Other

[Uncatalogued]

Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937 – “Me Too!” – 1883 – page 607 verso; color

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