John Sloan

A member of the Ashcan School, John Sloan (1871-1951) focused his paintings and prints on his favorite subject: the “drab, shabby, happy, sad, and human life” of a city and its people during the early 20th century. His images of pedestrians and public places helped define New York City in the popular imagination.  Sloan was also an able landscapist and portraitist. Thanks to the generosity of Helen Farr Sloan (1911-2005), the artist’s second wife and devoted widow, the Delaware Art Museum is home to the largest collection of art by Sloan, as well as the John Sloan Manuscript Collection, a treasure trove of archival materials.

The Delaware Art Museum organized the exhibition Seeing the City: Sloan’s New York, which focuses on John Sloan’s images of New York City in paintings, drawings, prints, and photographs to present an in-depth view of the artist’s years in the city and the city’s effect on his art.

Click on the images below for examples from our collection.

JOHN SLOAN TRUST

In 1996, Helen Farr Sloan established the John Sloan Trust to disperse works by John Sloan and support the artistic program of the Delaware Art Museum. A far-sighted and generous donor, Farr Sloan set aside a group of Sloan’s paintings to be sold, with profits from the sales to support the Museum’s artistic program. Works in the Trust are not part of the Museum’s permanent collection. They have never been accessioned into the collection, and all sales follow AAM and AAMD standards.

Works that remain in the John Sloan Trust are available for loan. For questions regarding the Trust, please contact Heather Campbell Coyle, Curator of American Art, hcoyle@delart.org.

Paintings: Paintings in the John Sloan Trust are sold primarily through Kraushaar Galleries of New York, the gallery that represented John Sloan during his lifetime, and occasionally through Christie’s.

Prints: Prints by John Sloan from the Estate of Helen Farr Sloan are also available through Kraushaar Galleries. In keeping with Helen Farr Sloan’s practices, prints from the Estate have also been donated to partnering museums with a significant interest in Sloan and his circle.